Productivity

This page is currently under construction. If you would like more details, or to contribute, please contact us here.

This is a summary of the productivity section

What is it?

Farm productivity is defined as the ratio of agricultural outputs to inputs.

Why should I care?

The productivity of our farms affects our competitiveness, income and savings, and quality of life. A productive farm is efficient and resilient.

It is important to compare our farm business performance to that of other comparable farms. By doing so we be sure that the view we hold of our farms performance and productivity is accurate (or not). It will also allow us to identity what we are doing well, and what areas may need some improvement.

Changes do not need to be expensive and/or time consuming to improve productivity. Small changes in a single area can have a large impact on the bottom line.

Where do I stand?

In order to increase productivity, we need to look at our farm records to identify strengths and weaknesses.

2 minute farmer are hoping to develop a tool that will help farmers to assess their productivity, and provide short and simple pieces of advice on the topic.

If you would like to get involved with this please email:

2minutefarmer@cornwall.ac.uk

For a full assessment go to our wheel tool

How can I improve?

We have several resources to explore

Calf survival

After feed, heifer calve rearing is the dairy farmer’s largest expense. Calves must also reach lactation to provide any return on investment. However, 0-12% of dairy heifers do not survive their first month. That said, with good management practices, a 0% loss is not unachievable.

Cattle Lameness

On dairy farms, lameness is used as an indicator of cattle welfare. Reproductive failure, decreased milk production and higher culling rates are all associated with lameness in dairy cattle. Discover the risk factors and cost of lameness within herds.

Cattle turn out

Utilising grass effectively is essential for the profitability of cattle enterprises. The following page provides an overview of best practice.

Enterprise Gross Margins

Compare your enterprise to data collected from a cross section of south west farms as part of the Farm Business Survey.

Lamb survival

15% of lambs born annually do not survive. 50% of these losses will occur within 24 hours after birth. It is possible for well performing flocks not to exceed lamb mortality rates of 5%.

Sheep parasite control

Gastrointestinal parasites are the most costly disease burden affecting sheep. In 2005 it cost the British Sheep Industry an estimated £84 million (Nieuwhof & Bishop, 2005).

Or go to these external links

Farmbench